The organs of Paris
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The Parisian organ landscape

before the revolution Organs in the 'French classical' style are rare in Paris. The revolution was like a tzunami: many monasteries and churches were destroyed, including their works of art and their organs. In 1789, there were approx. 150 churches and 50 convents. Approx. 130 of them vanished in the periode 1789-1860. In 1789, there were around 100 large organs and 30-40 smaller organs. In 1795, only 36 organs ahd survived. Nowadays, there are 24 organcases dating (at least partly) to before the revolution and 20 organs with stops dating to before the revolution (mostly 18th century). Only 3 of them still have a French classical character and 5 are rebuilt in a neo- classical style. The others were rebuilt in the 19th or 20th century. after the revolution Most Parisian organs date from after the revolution. The 19th century was the era of Cavaillé-Coll, creator of the symphonic organ. In the 20th century, the romantic and symphonic styles of the 19th century were merged with the classic style from before the revolution, creating a new organ type on which the repertoire of all periods could be played: the neoclassical organ.

All organs built after the revolution

19th century

20th century

21th century

All organs built before the revolution

French classical style (3 organs)

Neo-classical style (5 organs)

Rebuilt in 19th century (7 organs)

Rebuilt in 20th century (8 organs)

Organs of Paris

All organs built before the revolution

Organs in the 'French classical' style are rare in Paris. The revolution was like a tzunami: many, many monasteries and churches were destroyed, including their works of art and their organs. In 1789, there were approximately 150 churches and 50 convents. Approximately 130 of them vanished in the periode 1789-1860. In 1789, there were approximately 100 large organs and 30-40 smaller organs. In 1795, only 36 organs were left. Nowadays, there are 24 organcases dating (at least partly) to before the revolution and 20 organs with stops dating to before the revolution (mostly 18th century). Only 3 of them still have a French classical character and 5 are rebuilt in a neo- classical style. The others were rebuilt in the 19th or 20th century.

French classical style (3 organs)

Neo-classical style (5 organs)

Rebuilt in 19th century (7 organs)

Rebuilt in 20th century (8 organs)

ORGANS OF PARIS © 2024 Vincent Hildebrandt ALL ORGANS

All organs built after the revolution

Most Parisian organs date from after the revolution. The 19th century was the era of Cavaillé-Coll, creator of the symphonic organ. In the 20th century, the romantic and symphonic styles of the 19th century were merged with the classic style from before the revolution, creating a new organ type on which the repertoire of all periods could be played: the neoclassical organ.

19th century

20th century

21th century