The organs of Paris
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After the revolution

(1) Organs built in the 19th century

(2) Organs built in the 20th century

(3) Organs built in the 21th century

The 19th century: an exciting era in Paris! During the first decades of the 19th century, the organ building activities in Paris are scarce. The town and its churches are still recovering from all the devastations endured during the revolution. In the first three decades, it is mainly Dallery who performs maintenance works on some organs and who even builds a new organ (for the chapel of the Sorbonne, 1825). Dallery and this organ can be seen as the last representatives of the French classical organ building era. From 1830 onwards, organ building activities do increase slowly, with Daublaine-Callinet in the lead in the third decade and Cavaillé-Coll taking the lead in the rest of this century, starting a new and exciting chapter in the Parisian organ history. In the second half of the 19th century (and continuing in the first decade of the 20th century), the organ building reaches a unprecedented booming era in Paris, with Cavaillé-Coll being by far the market leader, and Merklin and Abbey being his main competitors. The   table   on   the   right   side   shows   the   main   organ   builders   of the    19th    century    and    the    numbers    of    organs    they    built    or restored and/or renovated. This    table    shows    clearly    the    dominance    of    Cavaillé-Coll,    in partiocular with regard to newly built organs.
Organs of Paris

After the revolution - 19th century

 

The 19th century: an exciting era in Paris!

During the first decades of the 19th century, the organ building activities in Paris are scars.  The town and its churches are still recovering from all the devastations endured during the revolution. In the first three decades, it is mainly Dallery who performs maintenance works on some organs and who even builds a new organ (for the chapel of the Sorbonne, 1825). Dallery and this organ can be seen as the last representatives of the French classical organ building era. From 1830 onwards, organ building activities do increase slowly, with Daublaine-Callinet in the lead in the third decade and Cavaillé-Coll taking the lead in the rest of this century, starting a new and exciting chapter in the Parisian organ history. In the second half of the 19th century (and continuing in the first decade of the 20th century), the organ building reaches a unprecedented booming era in Paris, with Cavaillé-Colll being by far the market leader, and Merklin being his main competitor. The   table   on   the   right   side   shows   the   main   organ   builders   of the   19th   century   and   the   numbers   of   organs   they   built   or restored    and/or    renovated.    This    table    shows    clearly    the dominance    of    Cavaillé-Coll,    in    partiocular    with    regard    to newly built organs.
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