The organs of Paris
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This category comprises seven organs from before the revolution which have been restored in the 19th century and which have not been substantially modified in the 20th century, among which two of the finest organs of Paris: Saint Roch and Saint Sulpice. Although both rebuilt by Cavaillé-Coll, their character is totally different. Saint Roch has preserved its French classical Grand Jeu for a great deal, comparable with the organ at Saint Louis de Versailles. The same can be said of the organs at St-Germain-de-l'Auxerrois and Saint Laurent. The organ of St Médard has been rebuilt by the Stoltz brothers and is basically a 19th century instrument. The (very interesting) organ at Saint Lieu - Saint Gilles is silent for years, while the organ at Saint Pierre de Montmartre contains no stops from before the revolution, only its case survived. The table on the right site summarizes the main characteristics of the seven organs from before the revolution which have been restored in the 19th century and which have not been substantially modified in the 20th century. With the exception of the organ of Saint-Médard (which is basically a Stoltz- organ) and the organ of Saint-Pierre-de-Montmartre (no stops at all from before the revolution), the percentage of old stops is 50% or more for all organs.
Organs of Paris

Before the revolution -

Organs rebuilt in the 19th century
This category comprises seven organs from before the revolution which have been restored in the 19th century and which have not been substantially modified in the 20th century, among which two of the finest organs of Paris: Saint Roch and Saint Sulpice. Although both rebuilt by Cavaillé-Coll, their character is totally different. Saint Roch has preserved its French classical Grand Jeu for a great deal, comparable with the organ at Saint Louis de Versailles. The same can be said of the organs at St- Germain-de-l'Auxerrois and Saint Laurent. The organ of St Médard has been rebuilt by the Stoltz brothers and is basically a 19th century instrument. The (very interesting) organ at Saint Lieu - Saint Gilles is silent for years, while the organ at Saint Pierre de Montmartre contains no stops from before the revolution, only its case survived. Saint-Germain-de-l'Auxerrois Sain-Laurent Saint-Lieu-Saint-Gilles Saint-Médard Saint-Pierre-de-Montmartre Saint-Roch Saint-Sulpice Saint Louis de Versailles The table below summarizes the main characteristics of the seven organs from before the revolution which have been restored in the 19th century and which have not been substantially modified in the 20th century. With the exception of the organ of Saint-Médard (which is basically a Stoltz- organ) and the organ of Saint-Pierre-de-Montmartre (no stops at all from before the revolution), the percentage of old stops is 50% or more for all organs.
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