The organs of Paris
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Dallery

Chapelle de la Sorbonne

Parisian organs built by Dallery

Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis (1805) (case only) Chapelle de la Sorbonne (1825)
The   founder   of   the   Dallery-dynasty   is Charles Dallery  (1702-1779). His   nephew   and   pupil   Pierre   Dallery   (1735-1812)    became    the    associate    of François-Henri    Clicquot    during    1767- 1778,      building      among      others      the organs        of        St-Nicolas-des-Champs (1773),     St-Merry     (1778)     and     Saint- Germain-de-l'Auxerrois   (1771),   before   starting   his   own   firm.   After the    revolution,    his    activities    were    mainly    moving    and    reinstalling      organs in the Parisian region. His     son     Pierre-François     (1764-1833,     photo)     became     one     of François-Henri’s   harmonists   and   continued   the   activities   of   François- Henri’s   son   Claude   François   Clicquot   (1762-1800)   after   his   death,   as well   as   those   of   his   father,   who   retired   in   1807.   He   mainly   restored organs. His    son    Louis-Paul    Dallery     (1797-1875)    carried    out    numerous restorations   and   built   in   1805   a   new   organ   for   Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis (only   the   buffet   still   exists,   modified)   and   in   1825   a   new   organ   for the   Chapel   of   the   Sorbonne,   which   is   one   of   the   few   new   organs   in that    era    in    Paris,    that    has    been    conserved    in    its    original    state (although it is silent for years). His   last   documented   work   was   a   restoration   of   the   organ   of   Saint- Thomas-d’Aquin (1842-1846). Louis-Paul   Dallery   was   the   last   representative   of   the   classical   French organ   style   and   could   not   keep   up   with   the   innovations   as   introduced   by Cavaillé-Coll.
Organs of Paris

Dallery

Chapelle de la Sorbonne

Parisian organs built by Dallery

Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis (1805) (case only) Chapelle de la Sorbonne (1825)
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     COLOPHON
The founder of the Dallery-dynasty is Charles Dallery  (1702-1779). His    nephew    and    pupil    Pierre    Dallery     (1735-1812)    became    the associate    of    François-Henri    Clicquot    during    1767-1778,    building among   others   the   organs   of   St-Nicolas-des-Champs   (1773),   St-Merry (1778)   and   Saint-Germain-de-l'Auxerrois   (1771),   before   starting   his own   firm.   After   the   revolution,   his   activities   were   mainly   moving   and reinstalling  organs in the Parisian region. His     son     Pierre-François     (1764-1833,     photo)     became     one     of François-Henri’s   harmonists   and   continued   the   activities   of   François- Henri’s   son   Claude   François   Clicquot   (1762-1800)   after   his   death,   as well   as   those   of   his   father,   who   retired   in   1807.   He   mainly   restored organs. His    son    Louis-Paul    Dallery     (1797-1875)    carried    out    numerous restorations   and   built   in   1805   a   new   organ   for   Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis (only   the   buffet   still   exists,   modified)   and   in   1825   a   new   organ   for the   Chapel   of   the   Sorbonne,   which   is   one   of   the   few   new   organs   in that    era    in    Paris,    that    has    been    conserved    in    its    original    state (although it is silent for years). His   last   documented   work   was   a   restoration   of   the   organ   of   Saint- Thomas-d’Aquin (1842-1846). Louis-Paul   Dallery   was   the   last   representative   of   the   classical   French organ   style   and   could   not   keep   up   with   the   innovations   as   introduced   by Cavaillé-Coll.