The organs of Paris
ORGANS OF PARIS © 2018 Vincent Hildebrandt          HOME       A-Z           

Somer

 Chateau de Versailles 

Organs in the Parisian region

built by Somer

Versailles, Chateau
Little   is   known   about   Nicolas   Somer    (around   1731-1771).   He   built three   organs   for   the   castle   of   Versailles   (1747-1753).   One   of   these organs   is   still   present   at   the   ‘Grand   cabinet’   of   Madame   Adélaïde (photo),   another   was   moved   to   the   Versailles   cathedral   St.   Louis   and from   there   to   St   Sulpice   in   1804,   until   1868,   when   it   was   returned   to Versailles   and   stored,   waiting   for   a   new   destination.   He   made   a   new organ   for   the   convent   of   the   ‘Bernardines   de   Penthémont’   (1765) and   started   works   on   the   organ   of   St.   Etienne-du-Mont   (finished after   his   death   by   Francois-Henri   Clicquot).   He   had   three   sons,   all organ    builders:    Jacques-Joseph,    Louis-Nicolas    et    Antoine-Jean    (or Jean-Antoine). Louis Somer did not work in Paris. Jean-Antoine     Somer      (1738-1830)     primarily     refurbished     organs which    had    been    damaged    during    the    revolution.    He    moved    the former   organ   of   the   Jacobins'   church   of   St.   Honoré   street   to   St- Philippe-du-Roule   in   1799   and   moved   the   former   organ   of   the   St. Victor   Abbey   to   Saint-Germain-des-Prés   in   1809.   He   repaired   the organ   of   St-Louis-des-Invalides   in   1806-1807.   From   1821   until   his death   in   1830,   he   was   associated   with   Louis   Callinet .   They   built   the old   organ   of   the   ‘Oratoire-du-Louvre’   church   (1828)   and   repaired   the organ of Saint-Germain-des-Prés (1828).  
Organs of Paris

Somer

 Chateau de Versailles 

Organs in the Parisian region

built by Somer

Versailles, Chateau
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     HOME        A-Z
Little   is   known   about   Nicolas   Somer    (around   1731-1771).   He   built three   organs   for   the   castle   of   Versailles   (1747-1753).   One   of   these organs   is   still   present   at   the   ‘Grand   cabinet’   of   Madame   Adélaïde (photo),   another   was   moved   to   the   Versailles   cathedral   St.   Louis   and from   there   to   St   Sulpice   in   1804,   until   1868,   when   it   was   returned   to Versailles   and   stored,   waiting   for   a   new   destination.   He   made   a   new organ   for   the   convent   of   the   ‘Bernardines   de   Penthémont’   (1765) and   started   works   on   the   organ   of   St.   Etienne-du-Mont   (finished after   his   death   by   Francois-Henri   Clicquot).   He   had   three   sons,   all organ    builders:    Jacques-Joseph,    Louis-Nicolas    et    Antoine-Jean    (or Jean-Antoine). Louis Somer did not work in Paris. Jean-Antoine     Somer      (1738-1830)     primarily     refurbished     organs which    had    been    damaged    during    the    revolution.    He    moved    the former   organ   of   the   Jacobins'   church   of   St.   Honoré   street   to   St- Philippe-du-Roule   in   1799   and   moved   the   former   organ   of   the   St. Victor   Abbey   to   Saint-Germain-des-Prés   in   1809.   He   repaired   the organ   of   St-Louis-des-Invalides   in   1806-1807.   From   1821   until   his death   in   1830,   he   was   associated   with   Louis   Callinet .   They   built   the old   organ   of   the   ‘Oratoire-du-Louvre’   church   (1828)   and   repaired   the organ of Saint-Germain-des-Prés (1828).