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Roethinger

This firm was founded in 1893 by Edmond Alexandre Roethinger (1866-1953) and his father Sigismund (1837-1926). Although born in Strasburg, Edmond Alexandre Roethinger owed nothing to the tradition of the Alsacian organ, since he had been fully trained in German workshops (Heinrich Koulen and Franz Borgias Mœrz). It is probably the interwar period which was the most active period of this firm, with new opportunities at the French market. The firm became the main business of organbuilding in Alsace after the bankruptcy of Joseph Rinckenbach in 1929. In this period many of the organ builders which would became famous as representatives of the Alsacian organ building tradition (Georges Schwenkedel, Ernest Mühleisen, Alfred Kern and Jean-Georges Koenig), passed or were trained in the workshops of Roethinger. In 1945, the son Max Joseph Alexandre Roethinger (1897-1981) took over, followed by his grandson André Edmond Roethinger (1928-2008). This period of activity of the company after the second world war was very successful too: many new organs were built in a neo-classical and later neobaroque style. The firm closed its doors in 1969.
Église Notre Dame des otages (1956) Parisian organs built by Roethinger Saint-Honoré-d'Eylau nouvelle Eglise Orgue de chœur (1939) Notre-Dame-des-otages (1956) Saint-Médard Orgue de chœur (1964)
Organs of Paris

Roethinger

Église Notre Dame des otages (1956) Parisian organs built by Roethinger Saint-Honoré-d'Eylau nouvelle Eglise Orgue de chœur (1939) Notre-Dame-des-otages (1956) Saint-Médard Orgue de chœur (1964)
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt COLOPHON
This firm was founded in 1893 by Edmond Alexandre Roethinger (1866-1953) and his father Sigismund (1837-1926). Although born in Strasburg, Edmond Alexandre Roethinger owed nothing to the tradition of the Alsacian organ, since he had been fully trained in German workshops (Heinrich Koulen and Franz Borgias Mœrz). It is probably the interwar period which was the most active period of this firm, with new opportunities at the French market. The firm became the main business of organbuilding in Alsace after the bankruptcy of Joseph Rinckenbach in 1929. In this period many of the organ builders which would became famous as representatives of the Alsacian organ building tradition (Georges Schwenkedel, Ernest Mühleisen, Alfred Kern and Jean-Georges Koenig), passed or were trained in the workshops of Roethinger. In 1945, the son Max Joseph Alexandre Roethinger (1897-1981) took over, followed by his grandson André Edmond Roethinger (1928-2008). This period of activity of the company after the second world war was very successful too: many new organs were built in a neo-classical and later neobaroque style. The firm closed its doors in 1969.