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Merklin

Joseph   Merklin   (1891-1905)   was   born   in 1819   in   Oberhausen   (Baden)   and   learned his    skills    at    the    workshop    of    his    father, Franz   Joseph   Merklin.   In   1843,   he   opened his   first   workshop   in   Belgium.   In   1849,   he went    into    partnership    with    his    foreman and    voicer    Friedrich    Schütze:    J.    Merklin- Schütze   et   Cie.   In   1855,   he   came   to   Paris   and   acquired   the   Parisian firm    of    Ducrocquet-Barker    (the    former    Daublaine-Callinet     firm), which   was   then   bankrupt.   In   the   same   year,   he   presented   his   first instrument   in   France   at   the   world   exhibition   in   Paris.   It   was   a   great success and sold to the Church Saint-Eugène  in Paris in 1856. In   1858,   he   definitively   established   his   company   in   Paris:   Société Anonyme   pour   la   fabrication   de   grandes   orgues.   Soon,   he   would become the great competitor of Cavaillé-Coll in France. In   1870,   he   left   that   company   to   found   a   new   one   :   Joseph   Merklin   et Cie.   After   the   Franco-Prussian   war,   he   moved   to   Lyon   in   1872.   In 1880,   he   founded   a   new   company   Merklin   et   Cie   with   his   son-in-law Charles   Michel,   but   this   firm   was   dissolved   in   1894   as   a   result   of   a disagreement   between   the   two   men.   Charles   Félix   Michel   continued the   workshop   in   Lyon,   which   was   dissolved   in   1902   and   later,   in 1905   taken   over   by   the   Swiss   company   Kuhn      (Michel-Merklin   et Kuhn).   This   firm   was   bought   by   Olaf   Dalsbaek   in   1976   and   the   name of the firm changed tot Dalsbaek-Merklin. Joseph    Merklin    moved    to    Paris    again    together    with    his    head    of workshop   Joseph   Gutschenritter,   under   the   name:   J.   Merklin   &   Cie. He   retired   in   1898   and   gave   his   shares   to   the   engineer   Philippe Decock.   The   firm   was   continued   by   Joseph   Gutschenritter .   Joseph Merklin died in 1905. Merklin   was   an   innovative      builder   and   introduced   in   1984   the   electro- pneumatic   system   (type   Schmoele-Mols),   which   allowed   a   large   distance between the console and the organ itself.
Organs of Paris

Merklin

ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     COLOPHON
Joseph    Merklin    (1891-1905)    was    born    in    1819    in    Oberhausen (Baden)   and   learned   his   skills   at   the   workshop   of   his   father,   Franz Joseph   Merklin.   In   1843,   he   opened   his   first   workshop   in   Belgium.   In 1849,    he    went    into    partnership    with    his    foreman    and    voicer Friedrich   Schütze:   J.   Merklin-Schütze   et   Cie.   In   1855,   he   came   to   Paris and   acquired   the   Parisian   firm   of   Ducrocquet-Barker   (the   former Daublaine-Callinet    firm),   which   was   then   bankrupt.   In   the   same   year, he   presented   his   first   instrument   in   France   at   the   world   exhibition   in Paris.   It   was   a   great   success   and   sold   to   the   Church   Saint-Eugène    in Paris in 1856. In   1858,   he   definitively   established   his   company   in   Paris:   Société Anonyme   pour   la   fabrication   de   grandes   orgues.   Soon,   he   would become the great competitor of Cavaillé-Coll in France. In   1870,   he   left   that   company   to   found   a   new   one   :   Joseph   Merklin   et Cie.   After   the   Franco-Prussian   war,   he   moved   to   Lyon   in   1872.   In 1880,   he   founded   a   new   company   Merklin   et   Cie   with   his   son-in-law Charles   Michel,   but   this   firm   was   dissolved   in   1894   as   a   result   of   a disagreement   between   the   two   men.   Charles   Félix   Michel   continued the   workshop   in   Lyon,   which   was   dissolved   in   1902   and   later,   in 1905   taken   over   by   the   Swiss   company   Kuhn      (Michel-Merklin   et Kuhn).   This   firm   was   bought   by   Olaf   Dalsbaek   in   1976   and   the   name of the firm changed tot Dalsbaek-Merklin. Joseph    Merklin    moved    to    Paris    again    together    with    his    head    of workshop   Joseph   Gutschenritter,   under   the   name:   J.   Merklin   &   Cie. He   retired   in   1898   and   gave   his   shares   to   the   engineer   Philippe Decock.   The   firm   was   continued   by   Joseph   Gutschenritter .   Joseph Merklin died in 1905. Merklin   was   an   innovative      builder   and   introduced   in   1984   the   electro- pneumatic   system   (type   Schmoele-Mols),   which   allowed   a   large   distance between the console and the organ itself.