The organs of Paris
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Haerpfer et al

Charles   Haerpfer   (1835-1909,   from   Bavaria,   Germany)   learned   his skills    at    Steinmeyer    and    Walcker    in    Germany    and    Bill    Haas    in Switzerland.    Étienne    Dalstein    (1834-1900,    from    Lorraine)    had    a background   of   carpenter.   The   two   men   worked   together   during   the construction    of    the    Cavaillé-Coll    organ    of    Saint-Sulpice    in    Paris. After that, they set up a workshop in Boulay in 1863. From   1905,   Frédéric   Haerpfer   (1879-1956)   and   Paul   Dalstein   (1868- 1926)    gradually    took    control    of    the    factory    and    in    1918    the company   was   taken   over   by   Frédéric   Haerpfer.   Dalstein-Haerpfer delivered more than 160 instruments, mainly in Germany. In   1946,   the   name   of   the   company   was   changed   into   Manufacture Lorraine    des    Grandes    Orgues    Haerpfer-Erman ,    when    the    former director   Walter   Haerpfer   (1909-1975)   associated   himself   with   Pierre Erman   (1913-1990).   Haerpfer-Erman   created   or   restored   some   50 instruments, mainly in a neoclassical style. From   1978   until   his   death   in   1999,   Théo   Haerpfer   (191946-1999) was   the   head   of   the   company   Manufacture   Lorraine   des   Grandes Orgues   Haerpfer ;   Pierre   Erman   retired   in   1978.   In   all,   the   dynasty built or restored from 1863 until 1999 about 550 instruments.
Église Notre Dame du travail (1991) Parisian organs built by Dalstein-Harpfer Eglise luthérienne Trinité-Saint Marcel - Saint-Marcel (1908) Parisian organs built by Harpfer Saint-Jean-Baptiste-de-Grenelle (1989) Notre-Dame-du-travail (1991)
Organs of Paris

Haerpfer et al

Église Notre Dame du travail (1991) Parisian organs built by Harpfer Saint-Jean-Baptiste-de-Grenelle (1989) Notre-Dame-du-travail (1991)
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Charles   Haerpfer   (1835-1909,   from   Bavaria,   Germany)   learned   his skills    at    Steinmeyer    and    Walcker    in    Germany    and    Bill    Haas    in Switzerland.    Étienne    Dalstein    (1834-1900,    from    Lorraine)    had    a background   of   carpenter.   The   two   men   worked   together   during   the construction    of    the    Cavaillé-Coll    organ    of    Saint-Sulpice    in    Paris. After that, they set up a workshop in Boulay in 1863. From   1905,   Frédéric   Haerpfer   (1879-1956)   and   Paul   Dalstein   (1868- 1926)    gradually    took    control    of    the    factory    and    in    1918    the company   was   taken   over   by   Frédéric   Haerpfer.   Dalstein-Haerpfer delivered more than 160 instruments, mainly in Germany. In   1946,   the   name   of   the   company   was   changed   into   Manufacture Lorraine    des    Grandes    Orgues    Haerpfer-Erman ,    when    the    former director   Walter   Haerpfer   (1909-1975)   associated   himself   with   Pierre Erman   (1913-1990).   Haerpfer-Erman   created   or   restored   some   50 instruments, mainly in a neoclassical style. From   1978   until   his   death   in   1999,   Théo   Haerpfer   (191946-1999) was   the   head   of   the   company   Manufacture   Lorraine   des   Grandes Orgues   Haerpfer ;   Pierre   Erman   retired   in   1978.   In   all,   the   dynasty built or restored from 1863 until 1999 about 550 instruments.