The organs of Paris
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Gutschenritter - Masset

Église Saint Dominique (1905) Parisian organs built by Gutschenritter/Masset Saint-Dominique (1905) Saint-Antoine des Quinze-vingts Choir organ (1909) Eglise luthérienne de la Villette (1930) Saint-Louis-en-l'Ile Orgue de chœur (1965)
Joseph Gutschenritter (1854-1913) , who learned his skills at the Cavaillé-Coll workshop, can be seen as the successor of Joseph Merklin. The latter left his company Merklin & Cie in 1894 due to a dispute with his partner and son-in-law Charles Félix Michel. He created a new company with his former foremen Joseph Gutschenritter et Philippe Decock: J. Merklin & Cie. After his retirement in 1898, his successors kept using this name for their firm. After the death of Joseph Merklin in 1905, the company continued under the directorship of Joseph Gutschenritter and he changed the name to include his own. Later, he associated himself with Robert Masset, creating the Maison Gutschenritter-Masset. Joseph, his son Gaston (1884-1949) and Robert Masset (*1910) were active in the Parisian region for almost a century, both in construction and restoration, until 1986.
Organs of Paris

Gutschenritter -

Masset

Église Saint Dominique (1905) Parisian organs built by Gutschenritter/Masset Saint-Dominique (1905) Saint-Antoine des Quinze-vingts Choir organ (1909) Eglise luthérienne de la Villette (1930) Saint-Louis-en-l'Ile Orgue de chœur (1965)
ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt COLOPHON
Joseph Gutschenritter (1854-1913) , who learned his skills at the Cavaillé-Coll workshop, can be seen as the successor of Joseph Merklin. The latter left his company Merklin & Cie in 1894 due to a dispute with his partner and son-in-law Charles Félix Michel. He created a new company with his former foremen Joseph Gutschenritter et Philippe Decock: J. Merklin & Cie. After his retirement in 1898, his successors kept using this name for their firm. After the death of Joseph Merklin in 1905, the company continued under the directorship of Joseph Gutschenritter and he changed the name to include his own. Later, he associated himself with Robert Masset, creating the Maison Gutschenritter-Masset. Joseph, his son Gaston (1884-1949) and Robert Masset (*1910) were active in the Parisian region for almost a century, both in construction and restoration, until 1986.