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Other organ builders

19th century

Delmotte - Fermis - Krischner - Martin - Link

Delmotte

The    Maison    Delmotte:    a    long    family    tradition    of    organ builders   passed   from   father   to   son.   In   1812,   Pierre-Fidèle Delmotte   (1792-1867),   watchmaker   as   his   father,   and   then organist,    created    his    own    firm    at    Saint-Léger    Hainaut, Belgium.   He   joined   for   a   decade   with   his   brother.   His   son Théophile   (1833-1909)   went   to   work   with   his   older   brother Constantin   in   the   Studio   in   Saint-Léger,   from   1855   until 1871.    Théophile    went    to    Paris    in    1855    to    learn    at    the      Cavaillé-Coll    workshop.    He    started    a    new    workshop    in Tournai,   Belgium,      in   1872,   along   with   another   brother, Edouard.   Upon   the   death   of   the   latter   in   1899,   Théophile directed   the   company   on   his   own   and   in   1903,   he   took   his son    Maurice    in    the    company.    When    Théophile    died    in 1909,     Maurice     was     the     only     manager     until     he     was succeeded by his own 21-year-old son Georges in 1946. Maurice   Delmotte   (1885-1961)   showed   an   intense   activity in     the     field     of     the     electric     traction     and     built     the monumental   organ   (110   stops)   at   the   National   Institute   of broadcasting   (I.N.R.)   in   Ixelles   (Brussels)   in   1940.   After   the unexpected    death    of    Georges,    the    family    tradition    was continued   by   two   of   his   nephews,   Guy   Seghers   and   Denys Delporte.   The   son   of   George,   Etienne   Delmotte,   became the    general    manager    of    the    company.    They    now    build organs     using     all     transmission     systems     (mechanical, electrical, pneumatic or electronic). The    work    list    of    the    Delmottes    company    mentions    the construction   of   approximately   150   new   organs   and   100 major works and restorations. More   information   on   Delmotte   here   (in   French).   There   is one     organ     of     Delmotte     in     Paris,     at     Saint-André-de- l’Europe.  

Joseph Arnoud Fermis

Joseph   Arnaud   Fermis   (1836-1889)   was   the   son   of   François Sylvain   Fermis,   a   carpenter   who   built   organ   cases   for   the Parisian    firm    of    Barker    and    Verschneider    (1860s).    This company   hired   Joseph   Arnaud,   being   already   trained   as   a carpenter,   organbuilder   and   organist.   Joseph   Fermis   was the   first   one   to   apply   a   tubular   action   system   to   slider soundboards    and    slider    chests,    patented    in    1866.    This system   was   applied   in   1878   for   the   new   organ   of   Saint- François-Xavier    in   Paris,   but   removed   in   1923.   The   only authentic   organ   of   Fermis   with   this   system   existing   today is   the   organ   of   Foix,   St.   Volusien.   He   also   built   organs   for the    St.    Denis    Cathedral    in    Réunion    and    for    the    Beijing Cathedral. Source:   ttp://www.musiqueorguequebec.ca/orgues/france/foixsv.htm

Hubert-François Krischner

Krischner (1834-1893) learned his skills at the workshop of Cavaillé-Coll, Daublaine, Merklin and Martin. He founded his own company in 1877 in Rouen and can be considered as the successor of Narfcisse Martin. His father Jean (1797-??) worked at Daublaine and Hubert had four sons (Georges, Henry, Ernest et Paul) who learned their craft at the workshop of their father. This dynasty came to an end with the death of Paul in 1934. It started in 1753. Saint- Paul-Saint-Louis, choir organ (1880).

Narcisse Martin

Little   is   known   about   Narcisse   Martin.   He   learned   his   skills at   the   Daublaine-Callinet-Ducrfoquet   firm   and   started   his won   company   in   1858.   Hubert   Krischer   (1834-1895)   was head of the workshop during the years 1858-1873. Martin    built    the    organ    of    St-Paul-St-Louis    (1871),    which was   modified   during   the   years,   but   restored   by   Bernard Dargassies in the spirit of Martin in 2005.

Orgelbau Link

This    German    firm    was    founded    in    1851    by    the    twin brothers   Link:    Paul   (1821-1891)   and   Johannes   (1821-1872) and    still    exists,    having    built    more    than    a    thousand instruments.   The   only   organ   in   Paris   of   this   firm   is   located at   the   l 'église   luthérienne   de   l'ascension   (Paris   XVII),   built in   1894   and   still   in   its   original   state,   a   nice   example   of German industrial organ building.

All organ builders who worked in Paris after the

revolution

Organs of Paris

Other organ builders

19th century

ORGANS OF PARIS 2.0 © Vincent Hildebrandt     HOME        A-Z
Delmotte - Fermis - Krischner - Martin - Link

Delmotte

The    Maison    Delmotte:    a    long    family    tradition    of    organ builders   passed   from   father   to   son.   In   1812,   Pierre-Fidèle Delmotte   (1792-1867),   watchmaker   as   his   father,   and   then organist,    created    his    own    firm    at    Saint-Léger    Hainaut, Belgium.   He   joined   for   a   decade   with   his   brother.   His   son Théophile   (1833-1909)   went   to   work   with   his   older   brother Constantin   in   the   Studio   in   Saint-Léger,   from   1855   until 1871.    Théophile    went    to    Paris    in    1855    to    learn    at    the      Cavaillé-Coll    workshop.    He    started    a    new    workshop    in Tournai,   Belgium,      in   1872,   along   with   another   brother, Edouard.   Upon   the   death   of   the   latter   in   1899,   Théophile directed   the   company   on   his   own   and   in   1903,   he   took   his son    Maurice    in    the    company.    When    Théophile    died    in 1909,     Maurice     was     the     only     manager     until     he     was succeeded by his own 21-year-old son Georges in 1946. Maurice   Delmotte   (1885-1961)   showed   an   intense   activity in     the     field     of     the     electric     traction     and     built     the monumental   organ   (110   stops)   at   the   National   Institute   of broadcasting   (I.N.R.)   in   Ixelles   (Brussels)   in   1940.   After   the unexpected    death    of    Georges,    the    family    tradition    was continued   by   two   of   his   nephews,   Guy   Seghers   and   Denys Delporte.   The   son   of   George,   Etienne   Delmotte,   became the    general    manager    of    the    company.    They    now    build organs     using     all     transmission     systems     (mechanical, electrical, pneumatic or electronic). The    work    list    of    the    Delmottes    company    mentions    the construction   of   approximately   150   new   organs   and   100 major works and restorations. More   information   on   Delmotte   here   (in   French).   There   is one     organ     of     Delmotte     in     Paris,     at     Saint-André-de- l’Europe.  

Joseph Arnoud Fermis

Joseph   Arnaud   Fermis   (1836-1889)   was   the   son   of   François Sylvain   Fermis,   a   carpenter   who   built   organ   cases   for   the Parisian    firm    of    Barker    and    Verschneider    (1860s).    This company   hired   Joseph   Arnaud,   being   already   trained   as   a carpenter,   organbuilder   and   organist.   Joseph   Fermis   was the   first   one   to   apply   a   tubular   action   system   to   slider soundboards    and    slider    chests,    patented    in    1866.    This system   was   applied   in   1878   for   the   new   organ   of   Saint- François-Xavier    in   Paris,   but   removed   in   1923.   The   only authentic   organ   of   Fermis   with   this   system   existing   today is   the   organ   of   Foix,   St.   Volusien.   He   also   built   organs   for the    St.    Denis    Cathedral    in    Réunion    and    for    the    Beijing Cathedral. Source:   ttp://www.musiqueorguequebec.ca/orgues/france/foixsv.htm

Hubert-François Krischner

Krischner (1834-1893) learned his skills at the workshop of Cavaillé-Coll, Daublaine, Merklin and Martin. He founded his own company in 1877 in Rouen and can be considered as the successor of Narfcisse Martin. His father Jean (1797-??) worked at Daublaine and Hubert had four sons (Georges, Henry, Ernest et Paul) who learned their craft at the workshop of their father. This dynasty came to an end with the death of Paul in 1934. It started in 1753. Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis, choir organ (1880).

Narcisse Martin

Little   is   known   about   Narcisse   Martin.   He   learned   his   skills at   the   Daublaine-Callinet-Ducrfoquet   firm   and   started   his won   company   in   1858.   Hubert   Krischer   (1834-1895)   was head of the workshop during the years 1858-1873. Martin    built    the    organ    of    St-Paul-St-Louis    (1871),    which was   modified   during   the   years,   but   restored   by   Bernard Dargassies in the spirit of Martin in 2005.

Orgelbau Link

This    German    firm    was    founded    in    1851    by    the    twin brothers   Link:    Paul   (1821-1891)   and   Johannes   (1821-1872) and    still    exists,    having    built    more    than    a    thousand instruments.   The   only   organ   in   Paris   of   this   firm   is   located at   the   l 'église   luthérienne   de   l'ascension   (Paris   XVII),   built in   1894   and   still   in   its   original   state,   a   nice   example   of German industrial organ building.

All organ builders who worked in Paris after the

revolution