The organs of Paris
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Other organ builders in the 18th century

Jean Bessart (??-1720) worked on the organ of St Laurent and was associated later with Julien Tribuot. His son Louis Bessart (??- 1764) was a former worker of François Thierry and worked at the organ of St Gervais. Julien Tribuot (1663-1722) learned his skills with Alexander Thierry and was associated with Robert Clicquot. They built the organ at the chapel of the castle of Versailles. His son Marcellin continued the workshop until his death in 1757. Both were working primarily outside Paris, but they did some maintenance works on organs in Paris. Nicolas Collard (xxxx-1761) and Claude Ferrand (??-1763) were Parisian organ builders in the 18th century, as was Francois- Henri Lesclop (??-1753), son of Henri Lesclop, who was for a time associated with Robert Clicquot and Adrien Picard L'Épine. Adrien Picard L'Épine (1735-1780). was the second son of François Picard de Lespine (1681-1761) and the uncle of the famous builder Jean-François Picard L'Épine (1732-1817). He learned his skills in Holland. He came to Paris in 1758, where he married Marie-Catherine Clicquot, sister of François-Henri Clicquot. In Paris, he worked on the organs of the chapelle St Louis de l'École Militaire (1772) and St. Médard (1778). The famous French organbuilder Dom Bédos de Celles (1709-1779), the Benedictine monk who wrote the monumental treatise ‘L’Art du facteur d’Orgues (1766-1778), came to the Abbey of Saint Germain des Prés in Paris in 1760. He moved to the Abbey of Saint Denis in 1763, where he died in 1779, the year following he completion of his treatise. In Paris, he was the Maecenas of Adrien L’Epine and guided him among others when building the organ of the Chapel St Louis of the Ecole Militaire. As an expert on organ building, he performed numerous examinations of new organs. He would have examined the new organ of Saint Sulpice, but he died a year before the completion of this organ. In his treatise, he mentions two Parisians builders: François-Henri Clicquot and Adrien L’Epine. Photo: St Séverin
after the revolution after the revolution before the revolution before the revolution after the revolution after the revolution
Organs of Paris

All organ builders

who worked in Paris before the revolution

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6

The organ builders in the 18th century

2/2

Other organ builders in the 18th century

Jean Bessart (??-1720) worked on the organ of St Laurent and was associated later with Julien Tribuot. His son Louis Bessart (??-1764) was a former worker of François Thierry and worked at the organ of St Gervais. Julien Tribuot (1663-1722) learned his skills with Alexander Thierry and was associated with Robert Clicquot. They built the organ at the chapel of the castle of Versailles. His son Marcellin continued the workshop until his death in 1757. Both were working primarily outside Paris, but they did some maintenance works on organs in Paris. Nicolas Collard (xxxx-1761) and Claude Ferrand (??- 1763) were Parisian organ builders in the 18th century, as was Francois-Henri Lesclop (??-1753), son of Henri Lesclop, who was for a time associated with Robert Clicquot and Adrien Picard L'Épine. Adrien Picard L'Épine (1735-1780). was the second son of François Picard de Lespine (1681-1761) and the uncle of the famous builder Jean-François Picard L'Épine (1732-1817). He learned his skills in Holland. He came to Paris in 1758, where he married Marie- Catherine Clicquot, sister of François-Henri Clicquot. In Paris, he worked on the organs of the chapelle St Louis de l'École Militaire (1772) and St. Médard (1778). The famous French organbuilder Dom Bédos de Celles (1709-1779), the Benedictine monk who wrote the monumental treatise ‘L’Art du facteur d’Orgues (1766- 1778), came to the Abbey of Saint Germain des Prés in Paris in 1760. He moved to the Abbey of Saint Denis in 1763, where he died in 1779, the year following he completion of his treatise. In Paris, he was the Maecenas of Adrien L’Epine and guided him among others when building the organ of the Chapel St Louis of the Ecole Militaire. As an expert on organ building, he performed numerous examinations of new organs. He would have examined the new organ of Saint Sulpice, but he died a year before the completion of this organ. In his treatise, he mentions two Parisians builders: François-Henri Clicquot and Adrien L’Epine. Photo: St Séverin
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