The organs of Paris
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All organ builders

who worked in Paris before the revolution

Organ builders in the 17th and

early 18th century 2/2

Other organ builders in the 18th century

Guy Jolly ( ??-1664) and Pierre Cauchois (xxx-1667) were Parisian organ builders in the 17th century. Cauchois was associated with the brothers De Héman, as was Pierre Desenclos (xxxx-1668), who learned his skills from Valéran De Héman and Nicolas Pescheur. He was associated with François and Jean de Héman. Guy Jolly worked on the organ at Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles. The second generation of Parisian organ builders ended with the death of Joly (1663), Thierry (1665), Cauchois (1667) and Désenclos (1667), leaving the playground to other builders like Etienne Enocq (pupil of Carlier and builder of the former organ of Saint Roch in 1671) and François Ducastel. François Ducastel (??-1684) was a pupil of Valéran De Héman and his son Hippolyte was associated with Alexandre Thierry. Francois and Hippolyte Du Castel built the organ of Saint-Laurent (1685). Jacques Carouge was another Parisian organ builder in this era (pupil of Thierry, working on the organ of Notre-Dame), as was Pierre-Francois Deslandes (1667-1709), who built, with his compagnon Briel (??-1729), the organ at the Chapelle de l'hôpital de la Salpêtrière (1709). The third generation of Parisian organ builders ended with the death of Thierry (1699), Ducastel (1700) and Henry Lesclop (1703?). The playground in the next century would be dominated by Clicquot (next to Lescop, Bessart and Ferrand).

The organ builders in the 18th century

Photo’s: St.Laurent, Salpetrière, Versailles
after the revolution after the revolution
Organs of Paris

All organ builders

who worked in Paris before the revolution

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Organ builders in the 17th and

early 18th century 2/2

Other organ builders in the 18th century

Guy Jolly ( ??-1664) and Pierre Cauchois (xxx-1667) were Parisian organ builders in the 17th century. Cauchois was associated with the brothers De Héman, as was Pierre Desenclos (xxxx-1668), who learned his skills from Valéran De Héman and Nicolas Pescheur. He was associated with François and Jean de Héman. Guy Jolly worked on the organ at Saint-Leu-Saint- Gilles. The second generation of Parisian organ builders ended with the death of Joly (1663), Thierry (1665), Cauchois (1667) and Désenclos (1667), leaving the playground to other builders like Etienne Enocq (pupil of Carlier and builder of the former organ of Saint Roch in 1671) and François Ducastel. François Ducastel (??-1684) was a pupil of Valéran De Héman and his son Hippolyte was associated with Alexandre Thierry. Francois and Hippolyte Du Castel built the organ of Saint-Laurent (1685). Jacques Carouge was another Parisian organ builder in this era (pupil of Thierry, working on the organ of Notre-Dame), as was Pierre-Francois Deslandes  (1667-1709), who built, with his compagnon Briel (??- 1729), the organ at the Chapelle de l'hôpital de la Salpêtrière (1709). The third generation of Parisian organ builders ended with the death of Thierry (1699), Ducastel (1700) and Henry Lesclop (1703?). The playground in the next century would be dominated by Clicquot (next to Lescop, Bessart and Ferrand).

The organ builders in the 18th century

Photo’s: St.Laurent, Salpetrière, Versailles
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